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What’s In Your Post-Viral Fatigue Toolkit?

Post-viral fatigue is not a new problem, yet now, over two years since the emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, interest and awareness is at an all-time high.

The term ‘post viral fatigue’ describes a condition that can happen weeks or months after the initial onset of a viral infection.

Post-viral fatigue or post viral fatigue syndrome is completely different to normal tiredness, can affect people of different ages and does not always relate to the severity of the initial viral infection. In addition to fatigue, other symptoms may include brain fog, headaches, joint pain, muscle soreness, sleep problems, depression and even recurring symptoms of viral infections such as sore throat and swollen lymph nodes.

I have still been experiencing brain clag – it feels different to brain fog. Plus, my ears are still blocked at times.

My recommended post-viral fatigue toolkit.

Glutathione – liver support

Mitochondria are often referred to as the energy-producing powerhouse of the cell, yet they are highly vulnerable to damage from oxidative stress. In addition, factors such as infection, oxidative stress and inflammation can negatively impact the blood brain barrier.

Glutathione is often referred to as the body’s master antioxidant and provides essential protection for both mitochondria and the blood brain barrier against oxidative damage.

Our bodies can make glutathione from the amino acids cysteine, glycine and glutamic acid; however, cysteine is often considered to be a rate-limiting step.

Supplementing with N-acetyl cysteine before breakfast supports the body’s production of glutathione.

Alpha lipoic acid

Alpha lipoic acid is also an important antioxidant, is capable of regenerating other key antioxidants such as glutathione, vitamin C and Co-enzyme Q10 and is involved in the activation of key antioxidant signalling pathways.

Co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10)

Levels of CoQ10 tend to decline with age. Supplemental CoQ10 has been shown to positively impact markers of inflammation.

Supplementation with CoQ10 may help to improve symptoms such as fatigue and depression.

Magnesium

‘Nature’s tranquiliser’ for the key roles it has to play in supporting calm, relaxation and a balanced stress response, yet magnesium is also essential for energy production and muscle function. It can be a real challenge to consume enough magnesium and levels are rapidly depleted during times of stress.

Curcumin

Is the main active component of turmeric and is best known for powerful and widespread anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity.

Green tea

A powerful antioxidant, it has been shown to positively influence multiple inflammatory pathways.

Quercetin

Is a bioflavonoid found in plants such as onions, berries, apples and capers. Quercetin may inhibit the release of histamine, prostaglandins and leukotrienes and protects against oxidative stress and inflammation.

Sulforaphane (active ingredient in broccoli)

Is a bioactive compound derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli. it has been widely studied for its incredible ability to activate many different antioxidant pathways in the body. These antioxidant pathways are crucial for protecting mitochondria and the blood brain barrier against oxidative stress, and for keeping inflammation in check.

Omega-3

Our bodies can use omega-3 fatty acids EPA & DHA as building blocks and are essential for switching inflammation off when it is no longer needed.

Yours in health and wellness,
Trish Tucker May